In 1957, Barney Rosset, Fred Jordan and a few others launched The Evergreen Review with work by Samuel Beckett, Jean-Paul Sartre, Mark Schorer, and James Purdy. For the next sixteen years, Evergreen published writing that launched an assault on American propriety: literary, sexual, and social. Evergreen’s genius lay in its ability to mix radical American voices from the literary and social fringes—Burroughs, Ginsberg, LeRoi Jones, Henry Miller—with a global cast of writers, many of whom were introduced to American readers by the magazine: Beckett, Genet, Grass, Ōe, Paz, Walcott, Nabokov. The magazine was often shocking, always intriguing. It featured some of the finest writing available, by writers whose influence continues to shape contemporary literature.

In 2017, Evergreen returns under the leadership of publisher John Oakes and editor-in-chief Dale Peck. The new Evergreen builds on Rosset’s legacy of searching out the stories that aren’t being told or aren’t being heard: stories that challenge our sensibilities and expand our understanding of the way people actually live in the world, and the way their truths can be expressed. Available free of charge in an online-only format, the magazine will feature fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from an international array of new and established writers. Additionally, new editions of Foxrock Books, the book publishing arm of The Evergreen Review, are being released on a periodic basis; the first two titles available in the series are Samuel Beckett’s Stirrings Still and Marguerite Duras’ The Man Sitting in the Corridor.

 

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